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Incandescent Light Bulb Becoming Obsolete, Energy Efficient Lighting and Lighting Installation the Future (Part I)

Incandescent Light Bulb Becoming Obsolete, Energy Efficient Lighting and Lighting Installation the Future (Part I)

on Jan 8, 2013 in adec electrical, Electrical Contractor, Electrical sevices, Latest News, Lighting Maintenance, Lighting Servces, Outdoor Lighting, Sign Maintenance, Sign Service, Signs

Incandescent-Light-Bulb-Becoming-Obsolete,-Energy-Efficient-Lighting-and-Lighting-Installation-the-Future-(Part-I)

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Incandescent Light Bulb Becoming Obsolete, Energy Efficient Lighting and Lighting Installation the Future (Part I) Incandescent Light Bulb Becoming Obsolete, Energy Efficient Lighting and Lighting Installation the Future (Part II) Let there be electrical light?!? Well, this statement is not synonymous with the beginning of time, but it is a beginning, nonetheless. The year was 1880 and an incredible invention was taking shape. From deep inside the workshop of Thomas Alva Edison, the incandescent bulb came into being.

In this two-part post, we will explore the history of the incandescent light bulb, and how it stacks up against newer technologies and alternative lighting installation.

Edison’s first bulbs used a carbon filament, but in 1910, William D. Coolidge, a renowned physicist (and general director for General Electric, of course!) developed the still-modern-day tungsten filament.

Since that time, the incandescent light bulb has dominated the race for illumination as the most popular lighting device and lighting installation service on the planet. In fact, millions of consumers still use incandescent light bulbs around their homes. However, incandescent bulbs are far from being the best lighting solution.

The Problem

Simply put, the problem with incandescent light bulbs is a classic case of “survival of the fittest.”In today’s world, the push for energy efficiency has rendered Thomas’ invention outdated… and, well, energy inefficient. The march of technology has given way to more efficient competitors: CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps) and LEDs (light emitting diodes).

Bye-Bye Bulb-ie?

The death of the incandescent light bulb is not only on the horizon, it is here. Cuba became the first country to ban the incandescent light bulbs in 2005, and as of 2010, the bulbs were no longer sold in the Philippines, Australia and Argentina. Incentive programs are taking shape, too, with some countries offering bulb exchange programs in an effort to save electricity. And, together with the European Union (EU), Canada and several states in the U.S. plan to ban incandescent bulbs this year.  But why all the fuss?

Enlightening Fact

Compared with other lighting devices and lighting installations, incandescent light bulbs use less than 10 percent of total electrical output to produce light. And the other 90 percent, you ask? Unfortunately, the incandescent bulb dispenses the remaining output as heat! This may be perfect in the wintertime, but it is wholly inefficient when it comes to energy conservation.

Have you jumped on the global bandwagon to ban the incandescent light bulb? Are they really that inefficient? Enlighten us, and tell us what you think: Should the incandescent light bulb be banned forever? Are LEDs, LED lighting installation and retrofitting the undisputed wave of the future? Find out in part two of this post.